A Series of Unfortunate Events is a Netflix show, debuted in January of 2017, which will have two more seasons. It starts with the theme song, telling us to Look Away (sung by Neil Patrick Harris). The changes in that song are so fun, though I didn’t notice until a few episodes in. It became my favorite thing to listen for. The theme is immediately followed by the narrator warning us that this will be an unpleasant story. Not only during the first episode, but each and every one.

beware

 

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I’m not sure if spit takes were ever actually very common on television or if they became infamous without being ubiquitous. But I feel like they were common! I would find it hard to believe that I have seen so many by only watching what I happen to love. So my question is, where are they now?

They are a decent enough comedy tool, great if executed well. You’d have some trouble finding a cartoon without one, I think. But it’s more rare, or seems that way, to see a live human spraying their drink out in laughter.

ah-pffffff

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Brutal fact of life: Gaming will never, ever be as cool as it was in the late 80s/early 90s. Why? Several factors contribute to it: 80s/90s hairstyles, general inability to see how much we would laugh at ourselves in the future, etc. But the biggest thing that made the time so awesome was that it was all so new. Sure, games had been around for over a decade at that point. But after the video game crash in ’84, the future of gaming was mostly relegated to being bulletpoint features on shitty home computers from Radioshack. Then came the NES, and everything exploded. Gaming, as it turned out, was the real deal. And it wasn’t going anywhere. Suddenly the entire subculture of video games went mainstream, and few people were ready for it — especially the people that quickly saw they could make a boatload of money from them.
GamePro

Magazines based solely on games literally sprung up over night. The two most prominent being Electronic Gaming Monthly, and Gamepro. Immediately out of the gate, Gamepro seemed to be the far more “color by the numbers” magazine created by people who had no clue what to do with a game magazine, and were just throwing stuff together in a way they thought would look cool to kids. Featuring blindingly bright layouts (I still can only see in shades of neon pink thanks to Gamepro), giant cartoony art, and a general mishmash of coverage more suited for an ADHD-addled chimp.

 

Gamepro quickly garnered a reputation as being that one kid who would always scream for attention on the playground, but no one would ever come close to him for fear that he would never leave you alone again. That didn’t stop Gamepro from making money though, since this was a time when you could put out anything game-related and kids would choke it down as fast as possible. Gamepro quickly saw that their aberration of a magazine was making gobs of money, so decided to take the next logical step and made a TV show.

 

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The 1990s had some remarkable television. Television that laid some of the groundwork for today’s greatest and most hilarious shows. Iconic television. Television that I’ll never, ever stop watching.

90s 90s 90s

Sitcoms in the 90s were just the best, really. Even with some of the amazing shows of today, we’ll never get back those sick nineties fashions, haircuts, dance moves, or wacky synth noises. Sure we’ll have some reboots, and nostalgic tendencies in newer shows, but it won’t be the same.

 

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The setup is common enough. Three adult children and their parents, along with some little ones, navigate the strange world of having all your family nearby. However, if you distill any sitcom to its most basic premise, they’d all be described as “Friends or family living or working together or near each other” imo. Of course, however, the differences are what make these shows worth watching!

This one is the not-so-new show Life in Pieces, from CBS (but more importantly Season 1 is on Netflix). And if you love it, you’re in luck! Season 2 is almost finished airing. But, since I’m loyal to my boo, Netflix, I’ve only seen Season 1, which I’ll talk about. Strangely, I can’t seem to find any positive reviews, so please take my word for it.

horror

 

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You’ve seen him. You’ve heard him bray about his “donkey sauce.” He is festooned with odd colors and odder compulsions. He is Donald Trump, 45th President of the United States.

No! Trump is merely orange. I speak of Food Network darling Guy Fieri, guilty of abetting more crimes against calories than every Subway restaurant put together.

guy is oily

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Dear Kathy,

Where do I start, as usual? Your range of work not only amazes me but confuses me. As a child watching Sister Act, no part of me expected you’d be one of my most favorite actresses and voice actors of all time. Of all time! FOREVER.

Kathy Najimy

It’s truly outrageous that your very first role did not launch you into blissful fame. There were some small parts that I’m sure you owned with all your glorious talent, sass, and wacky grace. You blossomed from Sister Mary Patrick to Peggy Hill and beyond.

 

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alt titles: “Blum, Blum, Blum, Blum, I Want You In My Room”, “Max Blum: Feels Like Homo”

Today is Adam Pally’s Birthday! Happy Birthday Adam. To celebrate we dedicate today’s article to the one and only Max Blum from Happy Endings. We are going to celebrate by also celebrating me because that is how things are done when they are done in the spirit of Max.

max blum
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One Day At A Time was originally a show in the 1970s about a family in Indianapolis. A recently divorced mother of three and her daughters, take things, well, one day at a time. Basically. I’ve never seen that version though, sorry.

This new iteration, brought to us of course by Netflix, King of Television, features the most adorable Cuban family and an opening theme by Gloria Estefan! So far it’s just one season, with 13 half-hour episodes. Rather than three daughters, the main character Penelope Alvarez has two children, a son and a daughter. She also has her mother living with them, Lydia, played by Rita Moreno, a hilarious, nervous Catholic abuelita.

dia

 

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