If you haven’t seen this year’s best new show, and Hulu’s very first actually good original show, go to Hulu right now and start watching Difficult People. The show has 8 episodes so far, as of this post. It is already renewed for a second season, because all is right in the world. However, today’s post is this season’s finale. Here’s to Difficult People!

Difficult People by Amanda Wood

The show stars Billy Eichner as Billy Epstein and Julie Klausner as Julie Kessler. They talk about pop culture and are fiercely loyal to one another, as friends should do and be. It seems like nothing in the world is more important to them than posting online and hanging out with each other. Billy Eichner is one of my favorite comedians. I love everything about him. When the show was first announced, I was pretty much already obsessed. Julie Klausner is not someone I had previously known about, but now I love her too.

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Often I have considered attending graduate school. There are few degrees that I would be interested in, such as Library and Information Sciences, or Publishing. But what I would really, truly want to study for too many hours a day and several more years of my life probably isn’t offered anywhere.

Here are some things that I would go all-in for, along with an example thesis I might choose. I’d even do my homework. In fact, if these programs were offered somewhere, I’d probably go back to school for all four, then hide away in a tiny house in Amandoll’s yard using my degrees by muttering to myself and my cats and a cardboard cutout of Harry Solomon.

Scornell University by Amanda Wood

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We know you miss Broad City as much as we do and can’t wait for whenever it starts again, so we’re here to help.

Whether your favorite  part of this scene was Abbi’s remarkable Drew Barrymore impression, the blood leaking from her mouth, or Ilana’s weed delivery to their moving taxi, we hope this satisfies all your Broad City needs. Every single one of them.

Click to enlarge.

Broad City Coloring Page

In my perfect dream world, legendary children’s show Sesame Street would be populated by old time movie stars parodying themselves outlandishly. I think I would have learned better lessons, and learned them better, if it had been this way. Are children supposed to identify with or look up to a fuzzy green monster with a bad attitude? Well maybe they do, but a magically re-animated Greta Garbo would have gotten the job done with so much more melodramatic class.

If I ever get a wish-granting monkey paw, this will be the reality of children’s television programming.

As always, click to see it in the full size. (You can see the other example of Greta in imaginary kids television in our Yo Garbo Garbo post.)

Garbo Street

You know how there are words out there for highly specific emotions? Like adronitis, the frustration over how long it takes to get to know someone. Or liberosis, the desire to care less about things. Is there a word for that feeling you get when you believe that there must be alternate realities that exist closely in space to your own reality, so close that they are ALMOST your reality, and that reality is that your real dad is cartoon buffoon Hong Kong Phooey? Does that even make sense? Great.

Well, since I was a very small child, I have had this feeling occasionally. And as I’ve aged, the feeling has lessened a bit, but it’s still there inside of me, shaping my personality to some extent.

Unlike other forms of insanity I probably have, this one can be traced directly to my mother. For as long as I’ve lived, my mother has always told this story about how she and some of the rest of my extended family took my older brother, then an only child, to see a Hanna-Barbera Icecapades show. While there, Hong Kong Phooey apparently took a liking to her and showed his ardor by sitting on her lap and dragging her from the audience to dance with her in front of everyone. She concludes this oft-told story by saying, “And then, nine months later, Amanda was born.”  Everyone laughs. Everyone always laughs. But once upon a time, I believed her. I was too young to understand that my mom might be kidding, but apparently old enough to catch the implication that Hong Kong Phooey was my real dad.

It turns out that if you start life thinking that you are half-cartoon, it kind of sticks with you, there in the middle, for all of the rest of your life. I mean, I know I am not actually a half-cartoon! Don’t send me to the asylum yet. Anyway, it would clearly have been an actor dressed up like Hong Kong Phooey, not the real poorly-animated dog. It would be like thinking that Santa and Mall Santas are the same thing. No! Regardless, in my idle time, I start to wonder what my alternate reality life must be like, the one where HKP was not an absentee father. Let’s look at my art therapy session.

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Do you like Seinfeld, trivia, and board games? Chances are pretty good that you do.

Seinfeld Trivia Game by Dollissa

Now that Seinfeld is on Hulu (yes, all of it), here I am, providing you with information about a much-needed Seinfeld accessory. What good is loving it, if you can’t prove it to your friends?

This isn’t just a trivia game, it’s a board game, meaning it is the best of both worlds in nerdery. The game boasts more than 500 trivia questions. The questions come in two forms: easy and hard. However, the difficulty differences are indistinguishable and whether you know the answer will be due to a combination of chance, having even seen that episode (if you’re not a super fan), and memory skills.

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  • no one has any smart phones
  • they don’t eat real meat anymore
  • there’s still white people
  • everyone isn’t addicted to the holodeck
  • there’s not one guy relentlessly quoting Seinfeld all the time
  • i guess i don’t really understand how a society could possibly exist without money
  • the government seems pretty efficient for the most part
  • they almost always do the right thing (as a group, anyway)
  • do they really only communicate with other ships when they are right near them?
  • everyone thinks the borg are evil but they’re just efficient. leave them alone.

Borglissa by Amanda Wood

Yo Gabba Gabba is a very good show for the very small child crowd, but it could be better. I am not at all suggesting that DJ Lance Rock is in any way deficient or lacking in wonderful personality. But imagine for a moment that a children’s show was designed to influence children to be haughty and urbane. What if instead of being taught to eat nutritious snacks and share with each other, they were taught to mix cocktails and silently arch their brows just so to convey snide judgment? Beatboxing and breakdancing are great, but are they as useful to know as how to seduce with a glance from across the room or how to melodramatically sigh before taking a deep drag from a ridiculously long cigarette holder that is perched in an impeccably manicured hand?

Decide for yourself. I know you’ll come to the correct conclusion. As always, click to make it larger. (You can see another example of Greta in an imaginary children’s television show on our Futility Street post.)

Yo Garbo Garbo! by Amanda Wood

Broad City is a 100% perfect show, and how could you not love season 2’s breakout character, voiced by Paul Downs, who also plays Trey, Abbi’s manager? Was that sentence confusing? We mean Bingo Bronson of course.

A lot of things happen in this episode, Wisdom Teeth, and you should really just watch it. However, the most memorable part featured our new favorite character, Bingo.

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